Zyprexa (Olanzapine) tablet
Eli Lilly and Company

Eli Lilly and Company
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Polyethylene Glycol, Unspecified
Polysorbate 80
LILLY;4112
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Polyethylene Glycol, Unspecified
Polysorbate 80
LILLY;4115
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Polyethylene Glycol, Unspecified
Polysorbate 80
LILLY;4116
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Polyethylene Glycol, Unspecified
Polysorbate 80
LILLY;4117
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Triacetin
FD&C Blue No. 2--Aluminum Lake
elliptical
LILLY;4415
Zyprexa
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Carnauba wax
Crospovidone, Unspecified
Hydroxypropyl Cellulose, Unspecified
Hypromellose, Unspecified
Lactose, Unspecified Form
Magnesium stearate
Microcrystalline cellulose
Titanium dioxide
Ferric Oxide Red
Polyethylene glycol 4000
elliptical
LILLY;4420
ZYPREXA
Zydis
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Gelatin, Unspecified
Mannitol
Methylparaben Sodium
Propylparaben Sodium
Aspartame
5
ZYPREXA
Zydis
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Gelatin, Unspecified
Mannitol
Methylparaben Sodium
Propylparaben Sodium
Aspartame
10
ZYPREXA
Zydis
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Gelatin, Unspecified
Mannitol
Methylparaben Sodium
Propylparaben Sodium
Aspartame
15
ZYPREXA
Zydis
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Gelatin, Unspecified
Mannitol
Methylparaben Sodium
Propylparaben Sodium
Aspartame
20
ZYPREXA
Intramuscular
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Olanzapine
Lactose monohydrate
Tartaric acid
Hydrochloric acid
Sodium hydroxide
Warnings and Precautions, Tardive Dyskinesia (5.6) 10/2019
Warnings and Precautions, Use in Patients with Concomitant Illness (5.14) Removed 4/2020
Warnings and Precautions, Anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) Effects (5.14) 4/2020

WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS

Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Analyses of seventeen placebo-controlled trials (modal duration of 10 weeks), largely in patients taking atypical antipsychotic drugs, revealed a risk of death in drug-treated patients of between 1.6 to 1.7 times the risk of death in placebo-treated patients. Over the course of a typical 10-week controlled trial, the rate of death in drug-treated patients was about 4.5%, compared to a rate of about 2.6% in the placebo group. Although the causes of death were varied, most of the deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (e.g., heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (e.g., pneumonia) in nature. Observational studies suggest that, similar to atypical antipsychotic drugs, treatment with conventional antipsychotic drugs may increase mortality. The extent to which the findings of increased mortality in observational studies may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to some characteristic(s) of the patients is not clear. ZYPREXA (olanzapine) is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1), Use in Specific Populations (8.5), and Patient Counseling Information (17)].

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Boxed Warning section of the package insert for Symbyax.

WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS

See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning.

  • Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. ZYPREXA is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis. (5.1, 8.5, 17)
  • When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Boxed Warning section of the package insert for Symbyax.

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ZYPREXA® (olanzapine) is an atypical antipsychotic indicated:

As oral formulation for the:

  • Treatment of schizophrenia. (1.1)
    • Adults: Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in patients with schizophrenia: two 6-week trials and one maintenance trial. (14.1)
    • Adolescents (ages 13-17): Efficacy was established in one 6-week trial in patients with schizophrenia (14.1). The increased potential (in adolescents compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia may lead clinicians to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents. (1.1)
  • Acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. (1.2)
    • Adults: Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in patients with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: two 3- to 4-week trials and one maintenance trial. (14.2)
    • Adolescents (ages 13-17): Efficacy was established in one 3-week trial in patients with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder (14.2). The increased potential (in adolescents compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia may lead clinicians to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents. (1.2)
  • Medication therapy for pediatric patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder should be undertaken only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation and with careful consideration of the potential risks. (1.3)
  • Adjunct to valproate or lithium in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. (1.2)
    • Efficacy was established in two 6-week clinical trials in adults (14.2). Maintenance efficacy has not been systematically evaluated.

As ZYPREXA IntraMuscular for the:

  • Treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar I mania. (1.4)
    • Efficacy was established in three 1-day trials in adults. (14.3)

As ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination for the:

  • Treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. (1.5)
    • Efficacy was established with Symbyax (olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination); refer to the product label for Symbyax.
  • Treatment of treatment resistant depression. (1.6)
    • Efficacy was established with Symbyax (olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination) in adults; refer to the product label for Symbyax.

1.1 Schizophrenia

Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with schizophrenia: two 6-week trials and one maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with schizophrenia (ages 13-17), efficacy was established in one 6-week trial [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

1.2 Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)

Monotherapy — Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: two 3- to 4-week trials and one monotherapy maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder (ages 13-17), efficacy was established in one 3-week trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and dyslipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

Adjunctive Therapy to Lithium or Valproate — Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder as an adjunct to lithium or valproate. Efficacy was established in two 6-week clinical trials in adults. The effectiveness of adjunctive therapy for longer-term use has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

1.3 Special Considerations in Treating Pediatric Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder

Pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are serious mental disorders; however, diagnosis can be challenging. For pediatric schizophrenia, symptom profiles can be variable, and for bipolar I disorder, pediatric patients may have variable patterns of periodicity of manic or mixed symptoms. It is recommended that medication therapy for pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder be initiated only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation has been performed and careful consideration given to the risks associated with medication treatment. Medication treatment for both pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder should be part of a total treatment program that often includes psychological, educational and social interventions.

1.4 ZYPREXA IntraMuscular: Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania

ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is indicated for the treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar I mania.

Efficacy was demonstrated in 3 short-term (24 hours of IM treatment) placebo-controlled trials in agitated adult inpatients with: schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) [see Clinical Studies (14.3)].

“Psychomotor agitation” is defined in DSM-IV as “excessive motor activity associated with a feeling of inner tension.” Patients experiencing agitation often manifest behaviors that interfere with their diagnosis and care, e.g., threatening behaviors, escalating or urgently distressing behavior, or self-exhausting behavior, leading clinicians to the use of intramuscular antipsychotic medications to achieve immediate control of the agitation.

1.5 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder

Oral ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination is indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, based on clinical studies. When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.

1.6 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Treatment Resistant Depression

Oral ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination is indicated for the treatment of treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in patients who do not respond to 2 separate trials of different antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode), based on clinical studies in adult patients. When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of treatment resistant depression.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Schizophrenia in adults (2.1)

Oral: Start at 5-10 mg once daily; Target: 10 mg/day within several days

Schizophrenia in adolescents (2.1)

Oral: Start at 2.5-5 mg once daily; Target: 10 mg/day

Bipolar I Disorder (manic or mixed episodes) in adults (2.2)

Oral: Start at 10 or 15 mg once daily

Bipolar I Disorder (manic or mixed episodes) in adolescents (2.2)

Oral: Start at 2.5-5 mg once daily; Target: 10 mg/day

Bipolar I Disorder (manic or mixed episodes) with lithium or valproate in adults (2.2)

Oral: Start at 10 mg once daily

Agitation associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania in adults (2.4)

IM: 10 mg (5 mg or 7.5 mg when clinically warranted)
Assess for orthostatic hypotension prior to subsequent dosing (max. 3 doses 2-4 hrs apart)

Depressive Episodes associated with Bipolar I Disorder in adults (2.5)

Oral in combination with fluoxetine: Start at 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine once daily

Depressive Episodes associated with Bipolar I Disorder in children and adolescents (2.5) Oral in combination with fluoxetine: Start at 2.5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine once daily

Treatment Resistant Depression in adults (2.6)

Oral in combination with fluoxetine: Start at 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine once daily

  • Lower starting dose recommended in debilitated or pharmacodynamically sensitive patients or patients with predisposition to hypotensive reactions, or with potential for slowed metabolism. (2.1)
  • Olanzapine may be given without regard to meals. (2.1)

ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination:

  • Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability. (2.5, 2.6)
  • Olanzapine monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder or treatment resistant depression. (2.5, 2.6)
  • Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in adults. (2.5, 2.6)
  • Safety of co-administration of doses above 12 mg olanzapine with 50 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in children and adolescents ages 10 to 17. (2.5)

2.1 Schizophrenia

Adults

Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 to 10 mg initially, with a target dose of 10 mg/day within several days. Further dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 1 week, since steady state for olanzapine would not be achieved for approximately 1 week in the typical patient. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

Efficacy in schizophrenia was demonstrated in a dose range of 10 to 15 mg/day in clinical trials. However, doses above 10 mg/day were not demonstrated to be more efficacious than the 10 mg/day dose. An increase to a dose greater than the target dose of 10 mg/day (i.e., to a dose of 15 mg/day or greater) is recommended only after clinical assessment. Olanzapine is not indicated for use in doses above 20 mg/day.

Dosing in Special Populations — The recommended starting dose is 5 mg in patients who are debilitated, who have a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, who otherwise exhibit a combination of factors that may result in slower metabolism of olanzapine (e.g., nonsmoking female patients ≥65 years of age), or who may be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients.

Maintenance Treatment — The effectiveness of oral olanzapine, 10 mg/day to 20 mg/day, in maintaining treatment response in schizophrenic patients who had been stable on ZYPREXA for approximately 8 weeks and were then followed for relapse has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The healthcare provider who elects to use ZYPREXA for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

Adolescents

Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with schizophrenia was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 12.5 mg/day (mean dose of 11.1 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

Maintenance Treatment — The efficacy of ZYPREXA for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in the adolescent population has not been systematically evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

2.2 Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)

Adults

Dose Selection for Monotherapy — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 10 or 15 mg. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 24 hours, reflecting the procedures in the placebo-controlled trials. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

Short-term (3-4 weeks) antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Maintenance Monotherapy — The benefit of maintaining bipolar I patients on monotherapy with oral ZYPREXA at a dose of 5 to 20 mg/day, after achieving a responder status for an average duration of 2 weeks, was demonstrated in a controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The healthcare provider who elects to use ZYPREXA for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

Dose Selection for Adjunctive Treatment — When administered as adjunctive treatment to lithium or valproate, oral olanzapine dosing should generally begin with 10 mg once-a-day without regard to meals.

Antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Adolescents

Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 10.7 mg/day (mean dose of 8.9 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

Maintenance Treatment — The efficacy of ZYPREXA for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in the adolescent population has not been evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

2.3 Administration of ZYPREXA ZYDIS (olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets)

After opening sachet, peel back foil on blister. Do not push tablet through foil. Immediately upon opening the blister, using dry hands, remove tablet and place entire ZYPREXA ZYDIS in the mouth. Tablet disintegration occurs rapidly in saliva so it can be easily swallowed with or without liquid.

2.4 ZYPREXA IntraMuscular: Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania

Dose Selection for Agitated Adult Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania — The efficacy of intramuscular olanzapine for injection in controlling agitation in these disorders was demonstrated in a dose range of 2.5 mg to 10 mg. The recommended dose in these patients is 10 mg. A lower dose of 5 or 7.5 mg may be considered when clinical factors warrant [see Clinical Studies (14.3)]. If agitation warranting additional intramuscular doses persists following the initial dose, subsequent doses up to 10 mg may be given. However, the efficacy of repeated doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection in agitated patients has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials. Also, the safety of total daily doses greater than 30 mg, or 10 mg injections given more frequently than 2 hours after the initial dose, and 4 hours after the second dose have not been evaluated in clinical trials. Maximal dosing of intramuscular olanzapine (e.g., 3 doses of 10 mg administered 2-4 hours apart) may be associated with a substantial occurrence of significant orthostatic hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)]. Thus, it is recommended that patients requiring subsequent intramuscular injections be assessed for orthostatic hypotension prior to the administration of any subsequent doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection. The administration of an additional dose to a patient with a clinically significant postural change in systolic blood pressure is not recommended.

If ongoing olanzapine therapy is clinically indicated, oral olanzapine may be initiated in a range of 5-20 mg/day as soon as clinically appropriate [see Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2)].

Intramuscular Dosing in Special Populations — A dose of 5 mg/injection should be considered for geriatric patients or when other clinical factors warrant. A lower dose of 2.5 mg/injection should be considered for patients who otherwise might be debilitated, be predisposed to hypotensive reactions, or be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Administration of ZYPREXA IntraMuscular — ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is intended for intramuscular use only. Do not administer intravenously or subcutaneously. Inject slowly, deep into the muscle mass.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit.

Directions for Preparation of ZYPREXA IntraMuscular with Sterile Water for Injection — Dissolve the contents of the vial using 2.1 mL of Sterile Water for Injection to provide a solution containing approximately 5 mg/mL of olanzapine. The resulting solution should appear clear and yellow. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular reconstituted with Sterile Water for Injection should be used immediately (within 1 hour) after reconstitution. Discard any unused portion.

The following table provides injection volumes for delivering various doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection reconstituted with Sterile Water for Injection.

Dose, mg Olanzapine Volume of Injection, mL
10 Withdraw total contents of vial
7.5 1.5
5 1
2.5 0.5

Physical Incompatibility Information — ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should be reconstituted only with Sterile Water for Injection. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should not be combined in a syringe with diazepam injection because precipitation occurs when these products are mixed. Lorazepam injection should not be used to reconstitute ZYPREXA IntraMuscular as this combination results in a delayed reconstitution time. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should not be combined in a syringe with haloperidol injection because the resulting low pH has been shown to degrade olanzapine over time.

2.5 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Adults

Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability within dose ranges of oral olanzapine 5 to 12.5 mg and fluoxetine 20 to 50 mg. Antidepressant efficacy was demonstrated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination in adult patients with a dose range of olanzapine 6 to 12 mg and fluoxetine 25 to 50 mg. Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in clinical studies.

Children and Adolescents (10-17 years of age)

Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 2.5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability. Safety of co-administration of doses above 12 mg olanzapine with 50 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in pediatric clinical studies.

Safety and efficacy of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination was determined in clinical trials supporting approval of Symbyax (fixed dose combination of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine). Symbyax is dosed between 3 mg/25 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day and 12 mg/50 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day. The following table demonstrates the appropriate individual component doses of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine versus Symbyax. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability.

Table 1: Approximate Dose Correspondence Between Symbyaxa and the Combination of ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine

a Symbyax (olanzapine/fluoxetine HCl) is a fixed-dose combination of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine.

For Use in Combination
Symbyax ZYPREXA Fluoxetine
(mg/day) (mg/day) (mg/day)
3 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine 2.5 20
6 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine 5 20
12 mg olanzapine/25 mg fluoxetine 10+2.5 20
6 mg olanzapine/50 mg fluoxetine 5 40+10
12 mg olanzapine/50 mg fluoxetine 10+2.5 40+10

While there is no body of evidence to answer the question of how long a patient treated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination should remain on it, it is generally accepted that bipolar I disorder, including the depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, is a chronic illness requiring chronic treatment. The healthcare provider should periodically reexamine the need for continued pharmacotherapy.

ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.

2.6 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Treatment Resistant Depression

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability within dose ranges of oral olanzapine 5 to 20 mg and fluoxetine 20 to 50 mg. Antidepressant efficacy was demonstrated with olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination in adult patients with a dose range of olanzapine 6 to 18 mg and fluoxetine 25 to 50 mg.

Safety and efficacy of olanzapine in combination with fluoxetine was determined in clinical trials supporting approval of Symbyax (fixed dose combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine). Symbyax is dosed between 3 mg/25 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day and 12 mg/50 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day. Table 1 above demonstrates the appropriate individual component doses of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine versus Symbyax. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability.

While there is no body of evidence to answer the question of how long a patient treated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination should remain on it, it is generally accepted that treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in adult patients who do not respond to 2 separate trials of different antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode) is a chronic illness requiring chronic treatment. The healthcare provider should periodically reexamine the need for continued pharmacotherapy.

Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in clinical studies.

ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for treatment of treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in patients who do not respond to 2 antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode).

2.7 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Dosing in Special Populations

The starting dose of oral olanzapine 2.5-5 mg with fluoxetine 20 mg should be used for patients with a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, patients with hepatic impairment, or patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow the metabolism of olanzapine or fluoxetine in combination (female gender, geriatric age, nonsmoking status), or those patients who may be pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine. Dosing modification may be necessary in patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow metabolism. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients. ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination have not been systematically studied in patients over 65 years of age or in patients under 10 years of age [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

The ZYPREXA 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, and 10 mg tablets are white, round, and imprinted in blue ink with LILLY and tablet number. The 15 mg tablets are elliptical, blue, and debossed with LILLY and tablet number. The 20 mg tablets are elliptical, pink, and debossed with LILLY and tablet number. Tablets are not scored. The tablets are available as follows:

TABLET STRENGTH
2.5 mg 5 mg 7.5 mg 10 mg 15 mg 20 mg
Tablet No. 4112 4115 4116 4117 4415 4420
Identification LILLY LILLY LILLY LILLY LILLY LILLY
4112 4115 4116 4117 4415 4420

ZYPREXA ZYDIS (olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets) are yellow, round, and debossed with the tablet strength. Tablets are not scored. The tablets are available as follows:

TABLET STRENGTH
ZYPREXA ZYDIS Tablets 5 mg 10 mg 15 mg 20 mg
Tablet No. 4453 4454 4455 4456
Debossed 5 10 15 20

ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is available as single-dose 10 mg vial (1s).

  • Tablets (not scored): 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20 mg. (3)
  • Orally Disintegrating Tablets (not scored): 5, 10, 15, 20 mg. (3)
  • Intramuscular Injection: 10 mg single-dose vial. (3)

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • None with ZYPREXA monotherapy.
  • When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Contraindications section of the package insert for Symbyax.
  • For specific information about the contraindications of lithium or valproate, refer to the Contraindications section of the package inserts for these other products.
  • None with ZYPREXA monotherapy. (4)
  • When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Contraindications section of the package insert for Symbyax®. (4)
  • When using ZYPREXA in combination with lithium or valproate, refer to the Contraindications section of the package inserts for those products. (4)

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Warnings and Precautions section of the package insert for Symbyax.

  • Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis: Increased risk of death and increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack). (5.1)
  • Suicide: The possibility of a suicide attempt is inherent in schizophrenia and in bipolar I disorder, and close supervision of high-risk patients should accompany drug therapy; when using in combination with fluoxetine, also refer to the Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions sections of the package insert for Symbyax. (5.2)
  • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: Manage with immediate discontinuation and close monitoring. (5.3)
  • Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS): Discontinue if DRESS is suspected. (5.4)
  • Metabolic Changes: Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been associated with metabolic changes including hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and weight gain. (5.5)
    • Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus: In some cases extreme and associated with ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar coma or death, has been reported in patients taking olanzapine. Patients taking olanzapine should be monitored for symptoms of hyperglycemia and undergo fasting blood glucose testing at the beginning of, and periodically during, treatment. (5.5)
    • Dyslipidemia: Undesirable alterations in lipids have been observed. Appropriate clinical monitoring is recommended, including fasting blood lipid testing at the beginning of, and periodically during, treatment. (5.5)
    • Weight Gain: Potential consequences of weight gain should be considered. Patients should receive regular monitoring of weight. (5.5)
  • Tardive Dyskinesia: Discontinue if clinically appropriate. (5.6)
  • Orthostatic Hypotension: Orthostatic hypotension associated with dizziness, tachycardia, bradycardia and, in some patients, syncope, may occur especially during initial dose titration. Use caution in patients with cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and those conditions that could affect hemodynamic responses. (5.7)
  • Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis: Has been reported with antipsychotics, including ZYPREXA. Patients with a history of a clinically significant low white blood cell count (WBC) or drug induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have their complete blood count (CBC) monitored frequently during the first few months of therapy and discontinuation of ZYPREXA should be considered at the first sign of a clinically significant decline in WBC in the absence of other causative factors. (5.9)
  • Seizures: Use cautiously in patients with a history of seizures or with conditions that potentially lower the seizure threshold. (5.11)
  • Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment: Has potential to impair judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution when operating machinery. (5.12)
  • Anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) Effects: Use with caution with other anticholinergic drugs and in patients with urinary retention, prostatic hypertrophy, constipation, paralytic ileus or related conditions. (5.14)
  • Hyperprolactinemia: May elevate prolactin levels. (5.15)
  • Use in Combination with Fluoxetine, Lithium or Valproate: Also refer to the package inserts for Symbyax, lithium, or valproate. (5.16)
  • Laboratory Tests: Monitor fasting blood glucose and lipid profiles at the beginning of, and periodically during, treatment. (5.17)

5.1 Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis

Increased Mortality — Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. ZYPREXA is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Boxed Warning, Use in Specific Populations (8.5), and Patient Counseling Information (17)].

In placebo-controlled clinical trials of elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis, the incidence of death in olanzapine-treated patients was significantly greater than placebo-treated patients (3.5% vs 1.5%, respectively).

Cerebrovascular Adverse Events (CVAE), Including Stroke — Cerebrovascular adverse events (e.g., stroke, transient ischemic attack), including fatalities, were reported in patients in trials of olanzapine in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis. In placebo-controlled trials, there was a significantly higher incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events in patients treated with olanzapine compared to patients treated with placebo. Olanzapine is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Boxed Warning and Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.2 Suicide

The possibility of a suicide attempt is inherent in schizophrenia and in bipolar I disorder, and close supervision of high-risk patients should accompany drug therapy. Prescriptions for olanzapine should be written for the smallest quantity of tablets consistent with good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose.

5.3 Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) has been reported in association with administration of antipsychotic drugs, including olanzapine. Clinical manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status and evidence of autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis and cardiac dysrhythmia). Additional signs may include elevated creatinine phosphokinase, myoglobinuria (rhabdomyolysis), and acute renal failure.

The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a diagnosis, it is important to exclude cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious medical illness (e.g., pneumonia, systemic infection, etc.) and untreated or inadequately treated extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever, and primary central nervous system pathology.

The management of NMS should include: 1) immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy; 2) intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring; and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which specific treatments are available. There is no general agreement about specific pharmacological treatment regimens for NMS.

If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered. The patient should be carefully monitored, since recurrences of NMS have been reported [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.4 Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS)

Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) has been reported with olanzapine exposure. DRESS may present with a cutaneous reaction (such as rash or exfoliative dermatitis), eosinophilia, fever, and/or lymphadenopathy with systemic complications such as hepatitis, nephritis, pneumonitis, myocarditis, and/or pericarditis. DRESS is sometimes fatal. Discontinue olanzapine if DRESS is suspected [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.5 Metabolic Changes

Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been associated with metabolic changes including hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and weight gain. Metabolic changes may be associated with increased cardiovascular/cerebrovascular risk. Olanzapine's specific metabolic profile is presented below.

Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus

Healthcare providers should consider the risks and benefits when prescribing olanzapine to patients with an established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, or having borderline increased blood glucose level (fasting 100-126 mg/dL, nonfasting 140-200 mg/dL). Patients taking olanzapine should be monitored regularly for worsening of glucose control. Patients starting treatment with olanzapine should undergo fasting blood glucose testing at the beginning of treatment and periodically during treatment. Any patient treated with atypical antipsychotics should be monitored for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Patients who develop symptoms of hyperglycemia during treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing. In some cases, hyperglycemia has resolved when the atypical antipsychotic was discontinued; however, some patients required continuation of anti-diabetic treatment despite discontinuation of the suspect drug [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

Hyperglycemia, in some cases extreme and associated with ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar coma or death, has been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics including olanzapine. Assessment of the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and glucose abnormalities is complicated by the possibility of an increased background risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia and the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the general population. Epidemiological studies suggest an increased risk of treatment-emergent hyperglycemia-related adverse reactions in patients treated with the atypical antipsychotics. While relative risk estimates are inconsistent, the association between atypical antipsychotics and increases in glucose levels appears to fall on a continuum and olanzapine appears to have a greater association than some other atypical antipsychotics.

Mean increases in blood glucose have been observed in patients treated (median exposure of 9.2 months) with olanzapine in phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE). The mean increase of serum glucose (fasting and nonfasting samples) from baseline to the average of the 2 highest serum concentrations was 15.0 mg/dL.

In a study of healthy volunteers, subjects who received olanzapine (N=22) for 3 weeks had a mean increase compared to baseline in fasting blood glucose of 2.3 mg/dL. Placebo-treated subjects (N=19) had a mean increase in fasting blood glucose compared to baseline of 0.34 mg/dL.

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adults — In an analysis of 5 placebo-controlled adult olanzapine monotherapy studies with a median treatment duration of approximately 3 weeks, olanzapine was associated with a greater mean change in fasting glucose levels compared to placebo (2.76 mg/dL versus 0.17 mg/dL). The difference in mean changes between olanzapine and placebo was greater in patients with evidence of glucose dysregulation at baseline (patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus or related adverse reactions, patients treated with anti-diabetic agents, patients with a baseline random glucose level ≥200 mg/dL, and/or a baseline fasting glucose level ≥126 mg/dL). Olanzapine-treated patients had a greater mean HbA1c increase from baseline of 0.04% (median exposure 21 days), compared to a mean HbA1c decrease of 0.06% in placebo-treated subjects (median exposure 17 days).

In an analysis of 8 placebo-controlled studies (median treatment exposure 4-5 weeks), 6.1% of olanzapine-treated subjects (N=855) had treatment-emergent glycosuria compared to 2.8% of placebo-treated subjects (N=599). Table 2 shows short-term and long-term changes in fasting glucose levels from adult olanzapine monotherapy studies.

Table 2: Changes in Fasting Glucose Levels from Adult Olanzapine Monotherapy Studies

a Not Applicable.

  Up to 12 weeks exposure At least 48 weeks exposure
Laboratory Analyte Category Change (at least once)
from Baseline
Treatment Arm N Patients N Patients
Fasting
Glucose
Normal to High
(<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 543 2.2% 345 12.8%
Placebo 293 3.4% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 178 17.4% 127 26.0%
Placebo 96 11.5% NAa NAa

The mean change in fasting glucose for patients exposed at least 48 weeks was 4.2 mg/dL (N=487). In analyses of patients who completed 9-12 months of olanzapine therapy, mean change in fasting and nonfasting glucose levels continued to increase over time.

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adolescents — The safety and efficacy of olanzapine have not been established in patients under the age of 13 years. In an analysis of 3 placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies of adolescent patients, including those with schizophrenia (6 weeks) or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) (3 weeks), olanzapine was associated with a greater mean change from baseline in fasting glucose levels compared to placebo (2.68 mg/dL versus -2.59 mg/dL). The mean change in fasting glucose for adolescents exposed at least 24 weeks was 3.1 mg/dL (N=121). Table 3 shows short-term and long-term changes in fasting blood glucose from adolescent olanzapine monotherapy studies.

Table 3: Changes in Fasting Glucose Levels from Adolescent Olanzapine Monotherapy Studies

a Not Applicable.

  Up to 12 weeks exposure At least 24 weeks exposure
Laboratory Analyte Category Change (at least once)
from Baseline
Treatment Arm N Patients N Patients
Fasting
Glucose
Normal to High
(<100 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 124 0% 108 0.9%
Placebo 53 1.9% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥100 mg/dL and <126 mg/dL to ≥126 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 14 14.3% 13 23.1%
Placebo 13 0% NAa NAa

Dyslipidemia

Undesirable alterations in lipids have been observed with olanzapine use. Clinical monitoring, including baseline and periodic follow-up lipid evaluations in patients using olanzapine, is recommended [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

Clinically significant, and sometimes very high (>500 mg/dL), elevations in triglyceride levels have been observed with olanzapine use. Modest mean increases in total cholesterol have also been seen with olanzapine use.

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adults — In an analysis of 5 placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies with treatment duration up to 12 weeks, olanzapine-treated patients had increases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides of 5.3 mg/dL, 3.0 mg/dL, and 20.8 mg/dL respectively compared to decreases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides of 6.1 mg/dL, 4.3 mg/dL, and 10.7 mg/dL for placebo-treated patients. For fasting HDL cholesterol, no clinically meaningful differences were observed between olanzapine-treated patients and placebo-treated patients. Mean increases in fasting lipid values (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) were greater in patients without evidence of lipid dysregulation at baseline, where lipid dysregulation was defined as patients diagnosed with dyslipidemia or related adverse reactions, patients treated with lipid lowering agents, or patients with high baseline lipid levels.

In long-term studies (at least 48 weeks), patients had increases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides of 5.6 mg/dL, 2.5 mg/dL, and 18.7 mg/dL, respectively, and a mean decrease in fasting HDL cholesterol of 0.16 mg/dL. In an analysis of patients who completed 12 months of therapy, the mean nonfasting total cholesterol did not increase further after approximately 4-6 months.

The proportion of patients who had changes (at least once) in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol or triglycerides from normal or borderline to high, or changes in HDL cholesterol from normal or borderline to low, was greater in long-term studies (at least 48 weeks) as compared with short-term studies. Table 4 shows categorical changes in fasting lipids values.

Table 4: Changes in Fasting Lipids Values from Adult Olanzapine Monotherapy Studies

a Not Applicable.

  Up to 12 weeks exposure At least 48 weeks exposure
Laboratory Analyte Category Change (at least once)
from Baseline
Treatment Arm
N

Patients

N

Patients
Fasting
Triglycerides
Increase by ≥50 mg/dL Olanzapine 745 39.6% 487 61.4%
Placebo 402 26.1% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<150 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 457 9.2% 293 32.4%
Placebo 251 4.4% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥150 mg/dL and <200 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 135 39.3% 75 70.7%
Placebo 65 20.0% NAa NAa
 
Fasting Total
Cholesterol
Increase by ≥40 mg/dL Olanzapine 745 21.6% 489 32.9%
Placebo 402 9.5% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<200 mg/dL to ≥240 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 392 2.8% 283 14.8%
Placebo 207 2.4% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥200 mg/dL and <240 mg/dL to ≥240 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 222 23.0% 125 55.2%
Placebo 112 12.5% NAa NAa
 
Fasting LDL
Cholesterol
Increase by ≥30 mg/dL Olanzapine 536 23.7% 483 39.8%
Placebo 304 14.1% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<100 mg/dL to ≥160 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 154 0% 123 7.3%
Placebo 82 1.2% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥100 mg/dL and <160 mg/dL to ≥160 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 302 10.6% 284 31.0%
Placebo 173 8.1% NAa NAa

In phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE), over a median exposure of 9.2 months, the mean increase in triglycerides in patients taking olanzapine was 40.5 mg/dL. In phase 1 of CATIE, the mean increase in total cholesterol was 9.4 mg/dL.

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adolescents — The safety and efficacy of olanzapine have not been established in patients under the age of 13 years. In an analysis of 3 placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies of adolescents, including those with schizophrenia (6 weeks) or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) (3 weeks), olanzapine-treated adolescents had increases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides of 12.9 mg/dL, 6.5 mg/dL, and 28.4 mg/dL, respectively, compared to increases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol of 1.3 mg/dL and 1.0 mg/dL, and a decrease in triglycerides of 1.1 mg/dL for placebo-treated adolescents. For fasting HDL cholesterol, no clinically meaningful differences were observed between olanzapine-treated adolescents and placebo-treated adolescents.

In long-term studies (at least 24 weeks), adolescents had increases from baseline in mean fasting total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides of 5.5 mg/dL, 5.4 mg/dL, and 20.5 mg/dL, respectively, and a mean decrease in fasting HDL cholesterol of 4.5 mg/dL. Table 5 shows categorical changes in fasting lipids values in adolescents.

Table 5: Changes in Fasting Lipids Values from Adolescent Olanzapine Monotherapy Studies

a Not Applicable.

  Up to 6 weeks exposure At least 24 weeks exposure
Laboratory Analyte Category Change (at least once)
from Baseline
Treatment Arm
N

Patients

N

Patients
Fasting
Triglycerides
Increase by ≥50 mg/dL Olanzapine 138 37.0% 122 45.9%
Placebo 66 15.2% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<90 mg/dL to >130 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 67 26.9% 66 36.4%
Placebo 28 10.7% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥90 mg/dL and ≤130 mg/dL to >130 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 37 59.5% 31 64.5%
Placebo 17 35.3% NAa NAa
 
Fasting Total
Cholesterol
Increase by ≥40 mg/dL Olanzapine 138 14.5% 122 14.8%
Placebo 66 4.5% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<170 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 87 6.9% 78 7.7%
Placebo 43 2.3% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥170 mg/dL and <200 mg/dL to ≥200 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 36 38.9% 33 57.6%
Placebo 13 7.7% NAa NAa
 
Fasting LDL
Cholesterol
Increase by ≥30 mg/dL Olanzapine 137 17.5% 121 22.3%
Placebo 63 11.1% NAa NAa
Normal to High
(<110 mg/dL to ≥130 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 98 5.1% 92 10.9%
Placebo 44 4.5% NAa NAa
Borderline to High
(≥110 mg/dL and <130 mg/dL to ≥130 mg/dL)
Olanzapine 29 48.3% 21 47.6%
Placebo 9 0% NAa NAa

Weight Gain

Potential consequences of weight gain should be considered prior to starting olanzapine. Patients receiving olanzapine should receive regular monitoring of weight [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adults — In an analysis of 13 placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies, olanzapine-treated patients gained an average of 2.6 kg (5.7 lb) compared to an average 0.3 kg (0.6 lb) weight loss in placebo-treated patients with a median exposure of 6 weeks; 22.2% of olanzapine-treated patients gained at least 7% of their baseline weight, compared to 3% of placebo-treated patients, with a median exposure to event of 8 weeks; 4.2% of olanzapine-treated patients gained at least 15% of their baseline weight, compared to 0.3% of placebo-treated patients, with a median exposure to event of 12 weeks. Clinically significant weight gain was observed across all baseline Body Mass Index (BMI) categories. Discontinuation due to weight gain occurred in 0.2% of olanzapine-treated patients and in 0% of placebo-treated patients.

In long-term studies (at least 48 weeks), the mean weight gain was 5.6 kg (12.3 lb) (median exposure of 573 days, N=2021). The percentages of patients who gained at least 7%, 15%, or 25% of their baseline body weight with long-term exposure were 64%, 32%, and 12%, respectively. Discontinuation due to weight gain occurred in 0.4% of olanzapine-treated patients following at least 48 weeks of exposure.

Table 6 includes data on adult weight gain with olanzapine pooled from 86 clinical trials. The data in each column represent data for those patients who completed treatment periods of the durations specified.

Table 6: Weight Gain with Olanzapine Use in Adults
Amount Gained
kg (lb)
6 Weeks
(N=7465)
(%)
6 Months
(N=4162)
(%)
12 Months
(N=1345)
(%)
24 Months
(N=474)
(%)
36 Months
(N=147)
(%)
≤0 26.2 24.3 20.8 23.2 17.0
0 to ≤5 (0-11 lb) 57.0 36.0 26.0 23.4 25.2
>5 to ≤10 (11-22 lb) 14.9 24.6 24.2 24.1 18.4
>10 to ≤15 (22-33 lb) 1.8 10.9 14.9 11.4 17.0
>15 to ≤20 (33-44 lb) 0.1 3.1 8.6 9.3 11.6
>20 to ≤25 (44-55 lb) 0 0.9 3.3 5.1 4.1
>25 to ≤30 (55-66 lb) 0 0.2 1.4 2.3 4.8
>30 (>66 lb) 0 0.1 0.8 1.2 2

Dose group differences with respect to weight gain have been observed. In a single 8-week randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose study comparing 10 (N=199), 20 (N=200) and 40 (N=200) mg/day of oral olanzapine in adult patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, mean baseline to endpoint increase in weight (10 mg/day: 1.9 kg; 20 mg/day: 2.3 kg; 40 mg/day: 3 kg) was observed with significant differences between 10 vs 40 mg/day.

Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adolescents — The safety and efficacy of olanzapine have not been established in patients under the age of 13 years. Mean increase in weight in adolescents was greater than in adults. In 4 placebo-controlled trials, discontinuation due to weight gain occurred in 1% of olanzapine-treated patients, compared to 0% of placebo-treated patients.

Table 7: Weight Gain with Olanzapine Use in Adolescents from 4 Placebo-Controlled Trials
Olanzapine-treated patients Placebo-treated patients
Mean change in body weight from baseline (median exposure = 3 weeks) 4.6 kg (10.1 lb) 0.3 kg (0.7 lb)
Percentage of patients who gained at least 7% of baseline body weight 40.6% 9.8%
(median exposure to 7% = 4 weeks) (median exposure to 7% = 8 weeks)
Percentage of patients who gained at least 15% of baseline body weight 7.1% 2.7%
(median exposure to 15% = 19 weeks) (median exposure to 15% = 8 weeks)

In long-term studies (at least 24 weeks), the mean weight gain was 11.2 kg (24.6 lb); (median exposure of 201 days, N=179). The percentages of adolescents who gained at least 7%, 15%, or 25% of their baseline body weight with long-term exposure were 89%, 55%, and 29%, respectively. Among adolescent patients, mean weight gain by baseline BMI category was 11.5 kg (25.3 lb), 12.1 kg (26.6 lb), and 12.7 kg (27.9 lb), respectively, for normal (N=106), overweight (N=26) and obese (N=17). Discontinuation due to weight gain occurred in 2.2% of olanzapine-treated patients following at least 24 weeks of exposure.

Table 8 shows data on adolescent weight gain with olanzapine pooled from 6 clinical trials. The data in each column represent data for those patients who completed treatment periods of the durations specified. Little clinical trial data is available on weight gain in adolescents with olanzapine beyond 6 months of treatment.

Table 8: Weight Gain with Olanzapine Use in Adolescents
Amount Gained
kg (lb)
6 Weeks
(N=243)
(%)
6 Months
(N=191)
(%)
≤0 2.9 2.1
0 to ≤5 (0-11 lb) 47.3 24.6
>5 to ≤10 (11-22 lb) 42.4 26.7
>10 to ≤15 (22-33 lb) 5.8 22.0
>15 to ≤20 (33-44 lb) 0.8 12.6
>20 to ≤25 (44-55 lb) 0.8 9.4
>25 to ≤30 (55-66 lb) 0 2.1
>30 to ≤35 (66-77 lb) 0 0
>35 to ≤40 (77-88 lb) 0 0
>40 (>88 lb) 0 0.5

5.6 Tardive Dyskinesia

A syndrome of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements may develop in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs. Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence estimates to predict, at the inception of antipsychotic treatment, which patients are likely to develop the syndrome. Whether antipsychotic drug products differ in their potential to cause tardive dyskinesia is unknown.

The risk of developing tardive dyskinesia and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of antipsychotic drugs administered to the patient increase. However, the syndrome can develop, although much less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses or may even arise after discontinuation of treatment.

Tardive dyskinesia may remit, partially or completely, if antipsychotic treatment is withdrawn. Antipsychotic treatment, itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and symptoms of the syndrome and thereby may possibly mask the underlying process. The effect that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown.

Given these considerations, olanzapine should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia. Chronic antipsychotic treatment should generally be reserved for patients (1) who suffer from a chronic illness that is known to respond to antipsychotic drugs, and (2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful treatments are not available or appropriate. In patients who do require chronic treatment, the smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response should be sought. The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically.

If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on olanzapine, drug discontinuation should be considered. However, some patients may require treatment with olanzapine despite the presence of the syndrome.

For specific information about the warnings of lithium or valproate, refer to the Warnings section of the package inserts for these other products.

5.7 Orthostatic Hypotension

Olanzapine may induce orthostatic hypotension associated with dizziness, tachycardia, bradycardia and, in some patients, syncope, especially during the initial dose-titration period, probably reflecting its α1-adrenergic antagonistic properties [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

From an analysis of the vital sign data in an integrated database of 41 completed clinical studies in adult patients treated with oral olanzapine, orthostatic hypotension was recorded in ≥20% (1277/6030) of patients.

For oral olanzapine therapy, the risk of orthostatic hypotension and syncope may be minimized by initiating therapy with 5 mg QD [see Dosage and Administration (2)]. A more gradual titration to the target dose should be considered if hypotension occurs.

Hypotension, bradycardia with or without hypotension, tachycardia, and syncope were also reported during the clinical trials with intramuscular olanzapine for injection. In an open-label clinical pharmacology study in nonagitated patients with schizophrenia in which the safety and tolerability of intramuscular olanzapine were evaluated under a maximal dosing regimen (three 10 mg doses administered 4 hours apart), approximately one-third of these patients experienced a significant orthostatic decrease in systolic blood pressure (i.e., decrease ≥30 mmHg) [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)]. Syncope was reported in 0.6% (15/2500) of olanzapine-treated patients in phase 2-3 oral olanzapine studies and in 0.3% (2/722) of olanzapine-treated patients with agitation in the intramuscular olanzapine for injection studies. Three normal volunteers in phase 1 studies with intramuscular olanzapine experienced hypotension, bradycardia, and sinus pauses of up to 6 seconds that spontaneously resolved (in 2 cases the reactions occurred on intramuscular olanzapine, and in 1 case, on oral olanzapine). The risk for this sequence of hypotension, bradycardia, and sinus pause may be greater in nonpsychiatric patients compared to psychiatric patients who are possibly more adapted to certain effects of psychotropic drugs. For intramuscular olanzapine for injection therapy, patients should remain recumbent if drowsy or dizzy after injection until examination has indicated that they are not experiencing postural hypotension, bradycardia, and/or hypoventilation.

Olanzapine should be used with particular caution in patients with known cardiovascular disease (history of myocardial infarction or ischemia, heart failure, or conduction abnormalities), cerebrovascular disease, and conditions which would predispose patients to hypotension (dehydration, hypovolemia, and treatment with antihypertensive medications) where the occurrence of syncope, or hypotension and/or bradycardia might put the patient at increased medical risk.

Caution is necessary in patients who receive treatment with other drugs having effects that can induce hypotension, bradycardia, respiratory or central nervous system depression [see Drug Interactions (7)]. Concomitant administration of intramuscular olanzapine and parenteral benzodiazepine is not recommended due to the potential for excessive sedation and cardiorespiratory depression.

5.8 Falls

ZYPREXA may cause somnolence, postural hypotension, motor and sensory instability, which may lead to falls and, consequently, fractures or other injuries. For patients with diseases, conditions, or medications that could exacerbate these effects, complete fall risk assessments when initiating antipsychotic treatment and recurrently for patients on long-term antipsychotic therapy.

5.9 Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis

Class Effect — In clinical trial and/or postmarketing experience, events of leukopenia/neutropenia have been reported temporally related to antipsychotic agents, including ZYPREXA. Agranulocytosis has also been reported.

Possible risk factors for leukopenia/neutropenia include pre-existing low white blood cell count (WBC) and history of drug induced leukopenia/neutropenia. Patients with a history of a clinically significant low WBC or drug induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have their complete blood count (CBC) monitored frequently during the first few months of therapy and discontinuation of ZYPREXA should be considered at the first sign of a clinically significant decline in WBC in the absence of other causative factors.

Patients with clinically significant neutropenia should be carefully monitored for fever or other symptoms or signs of infection and treated promptly if such symptoms or signs occur. Patients with severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3) should discontinue ZYPREXA and have their WBC followed until recovery.

5.10 Dysphagia

Esophageal dysmotility and aspiration have been associated with antipsychotic drug use. Aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced Alzheimer's disease. Olanzapine is not approved for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

5.11 Seizures

During premarketing testing, seizures occurred in 0.9% (22/2500) of olanzapine-treated patients. There were confounding factors that may have contributed to the occurrence of seizures in many of these cases. Olanzapine should be used cautiously in patients with a history of seizures or with conditions that potentially lower the seizure threshold, e.g., Alzheimer's dementia. Olanzapine is not approved for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Conditions that lower the seizure threshold may be more prevalent in a population of 65 years or older.

5.12 Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment

Somnolence was a commonly reported adverse reaction associated with olanzapine treatment, occurring at an incidence of 26% in olanzapine patients compared to 15% in placebo patients. This adverse reaction was also dose related. Somnolence led to discontinuation in 0.4% (9/2500) of patients in the premarketing database.

Since olanzapine has the potential to impair judgment, thinking, or motor skills, patients should be cautioned about operating hazardous machinery, including automobiles, until they are reasonably certain that olanzapine therapy does not affect them adversely [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.13 Body Temperature Regulation

Disruption of the body's ability to reduce core body temperature has been attributed to antipsychotic agents. Appropriate care is advised when prescribing olanzapine for patients who will be experiencing conditions which may contribute to an elevation in core body temperature, e.g., exercising strenuously, exposure to extreme heat, receiving concomitant medication with anticholinergic activity, or being subject to dehydration [see Patient Counseling Information (17)].

5.14 Anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) Effects

Olanzapine exhibits in vitro muscarinic receptor affinity [see Clinical Pharmacology 12.2]. In premarketing clinical trials, Zyprexa was associated with constipation, dry mouth, and tachycardia, all adverse reactions possibly related to cholinergic antagonism. Such adverse reactions were not often the basis for discontinuations, but Zyprexa should be used with caution in patients with a current diagnosis or prior history of urinary retention, clinically significant prostatic hypertrophy, constipation, or a history of paralytic ileus or related conditions. In post marketing experience, the risk for severe adverse reactions (including fatalities) was increased with concomitant use of anticholinergic medications [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].

5.15 Hyperprolactinemia

As with other drugs that antagonize dopamine D2 receptors, olanzapine elevates prolactin levels, and the elevation persists during chronic administration. Hyperprolactinemia may suppress hypothalamic GnRH, resulting in reduced pituitary gonadotropin secretion. This, in turn, may inhibit reproductive function by impairing gonadal steroidogenesis in both female and male patients. Galactorrhea, amenorrhea, gynecomastia, and impotence have been reported in patients receiving prolactin-elevating compounds. Long-standing hyperprolactinemia when associated with hypogonadism may lead to decreased bone density in both female and male subjects.

Tissue culture experiments indicate that approximately one-third of human breast cancers are prolactin dependent in vitro, a factor of potential importance if the prescription of these drugs is contemplated in a patient with previously detected breast cancer. As is common with compounds which increase prolactin release, an increase in mammary gland neoplasia was observed in the olanzapine carcinogenicity studies conducted in mice and rats [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)]. Neither clinical studies nor epidemiologic studies conducted to date have shown an association between chronic administration of this class of drugs and tumorigenesis in humans; the available evidence is considered too limited to be conclusive at this time.

In placebo-controlled olanzapine clinical studies (up to 12 weeks), changes from normal to high in prolactin concentrations were observed in 30% of adults treated with olanzapine as compared to 10.5% of adults treated with placebo. In a pooled analysis from clinical studies including 8136 adults treated with olanzapine, potentially associated clinical manifestations included menstrual-related events1 (2% [49/3240] of females), sexual function-related events2 (2% [150/8136] of females and males), and breast-related events3 (0.7% [23/3240] of females, 0.2% [9/4896] of males).

In placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies in adolescent patients (up to 6 weeks) with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), changes from normal to high in prolactin concentrations were observed in 47% of olanzapine-treated patients compared to 7% of placebo-treated patients. In a pooled analysis from clinical trials including 454 adolescents treated with olanzapine, potentially associated clinical manifestations included menstrual-related events1 (1% [2/168] of females), sexual function-related events2 (0.7% [3/454] of females and males), and breast-related events3 (2% [3/168] of females, 2% [7/286] of males) [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

1 Based on a search of the following terms: amenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, menstruation delayed, and oligomenorrhea.
2 Based on a search of the following terms: anorgasmia, delayed ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, decreased libido, loss of libido, abnormal orgasm, and sexual dysfunction.
3 Based on a search of the following terms: breast discharge, enlargement or swelling, galactorrhea, gynecomastia, and lactation disorder.

Dose group differences with respect to prolactin elevation have been observed. In a single 8-week randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose study comparing 10 (N=199), 20 (N=200) and 40 (N=200) mg/day of oral olanzapine in adult patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, incidence of prolactin elevation >24.2 ng/mL (female) or >18.77 ng/mL (male) at any time during the trial (10 mg/day: 31.2%; 20 mg/day: 42.7%; 40 mg/day: 61.1%) indicated significant differences between 10 vs 40 mg/day and 20 vs 40 mg/day.

5.16 Use in Combination with Fluoxetine, Lithium, or Valproate

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, the prescriber should also refer to the Warnings and Precautions section of the package insert for Symbyax. When using ZYPREXA in combination with lithium or valproate, the prescriber should refer to the Warnings and Precautions sections of the package inserts for lithium or valproate [see Drug Interactions (7)].

5.17 Laboratory Tests

Fasting blood glucose testing and lipid profile at the beginning of, and periodically during, treatment is recommended [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5) and Patient Counseling Information (17)].

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Adverse Reactions section of the package insert for Symbyax.

Most common adverse reactions (≥5% and at least twice that for placebo) associated with:

Oral Olanzapine Monotherapy:

  • Schizophrenia (Adults) – postural hypotension, constipation, weight gain, dizziness, personality disorder, akathisia. (6.1)
  • Schizophrenia (Adolescents) – sedation, weight increased, headache, increased appetite, dizziness, abdominal pain, pain in extremity, fatigue, dry mouth. (6.1)
  • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adults) – asthenia, dry mouth, constipation, increased appetite, somnolence, dizziness, tremor. (6.1)
  • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adolescents) – sedation, weight increased, increased appetite, headache, fatigue, dizziness, dry mouth, abdominal pain, pain in extremity. (6.1)

Combination of ZYPREXA and Lithium or Valproate:

  • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adults) – dry mouth, weight gain, increased appetite, dizziness, back pain, constipation, speech disorder, increased salivation, amnesia, paresthesia. (6.1)

ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Also refer to the Adverse Reactions section of the package insert for Symbyax. (6)

ZYPREXA IntraMuscular for Injection:

  • Agitation with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania (Adults) – somnolence. (6.1)

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Eli Lilly and Company at 1-800-LillyRx (1-800-545-5979) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect or predict the rates observed in practice.

Clinical Trials in Adults

The information below for olanzapine is derived from a clinical trial database for olanzapine consisting of 10,504 adult patients with approximately 4765 patient-years of exposure to olanzapine plus 722 patients with exposure to intramuscular olanzapine for injection. This database includes: (1) 2500 patients who participated in multiple-dose oral olanzapine premarketing trials in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease representing approximately 1122 patient-years of exposure as of February 14, 1995; (2) 182 patients who participated in oral olanzapine premarketing bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) trials representing approximately 66 patient-years of exposure; (3) 191 patients who participated in an oral olanzapine trial of patients having various psychiatric symptoms in association with Alzheimer's disease representing approximately 29 patient-years of exposure; (4) 5788 additional patients from 88 oral olanzapine clinical trials as of December 31, 2001; (5) 1843 additional patients from 41 olanzapine clinical trials as of October 31, 2011; and (6) 722 patients who participated in intramuscular olanzapine for injection premarketing trials in agitated patients with schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), or dementia. Also included below is information from the premarketing 6-week clinical study database for olanzapine in combination with lithium or valproate, consisting of 224 patients who participated in bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) trials with approximately 22 patient-years of exposure.

The conditions and duration of treatment with olanzapine varied greatly and included (in overlapping categories) open-label and double-blind phases of studies, inpatients and outpatients, fixed-dose and dose-titration studies, and short-term or longer-term exposure. Adverse reactions were assessed by collecting adverse reactions, results of physical examinations, vital signs, weights, laboratory analytes, ECGs, chest x-rays, and results of ophthalmologic examinations.

Certain portions of the discussion below relating to objective or numeric safety parameters, namely, dose-dependent adverse reactions, vital sign changes, weight gain, laboratory changes, and ECG changes are derived from studies in patients with schizophrenia and have not been duplicated for bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) or agitation. However, this information is also generally applicable to bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) and agitation.

Adverse reactions during exposure were obtained by spontaneous report and recorded by clinical investigators using terminology of their own choosing. Consequently, it is not possible to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse reactions without first grouping similar types of reactions into a smaller number of standardized reaction categories. In the tables and tabulations that follow, MedDRA and COSTART Dictionary terminology has been used to classify reported adverse reactions.

The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse reaction of the type listed. A reaction was considered treatment emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy following baseline evaluation. The reported reactions do not include those reaction terms that were so general as to be uninformative. Reactions listed elsewhere in labeling may not be repeated below. It is important to emphasize that, although the reactions occurred during treatment with olanzapine, they were not necessarily caused by it. The entire label should be read to gain a complete understanding of the safety profile of olanzapine.

The prescriber should be aware that the figures in the tables and tabulations cannot be used to predict the incidence of side effects in the course of usual medical practice where patient characteristics and other factors differ from those that prevailed in the clinical trials. Similarly, the cited frequencies cannot be compared with figures obtained from other clinical investigations involving different treatments, uses, and investigators. The cited figures, however, do provide the prescribing healthcare provider with some basis for estimating the relative contribution of drug and nondrug factors to the adverse reactions incidence in the population studied.

Incidence of Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled and Combination Trials

The following findings are based on premarketing trials of (1) oral olanzapine for schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), a subsequent trial of patients having various psychiatric symptoms in association with Alzheimer's disease, and premarketing combination trials, and (2) intramuscular olanzapine for injection in agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I mania.

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

Schizophrenia — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (5% for oral olanzapine vs 6% for placebo). However, discontinuations due to increases in ALT were considered to be drug related (2% for oral olanzapine vs 0% for placebo).

Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes) Monotherapy — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (2% for oral olanzapine vs 2% for placebo).

Agitation — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (0.4% for intramuscular olanzapine for injection vs 0% for placebo).

Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term Combination Trials

Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes), Olanzapine as Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate — In a study of patients who were already tolerating either lithium or valproate as monotherapy, discontinuation rates due to adverse reactions were 11% for the combination of oral olanzapine with lithium or valproate compared to 2% for patients who remained on lithium or valproate monotherapy. Discontinuations with the combination of oral olanzapine and lithium or valproate that occurred in more than 1 patient were: somnolence (3%), weight gain (1%), and peripheral edema (1%).

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

The most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of oral olanzapine (incidence of 5% or greater) and not observed at an equivalent incidence among placebo-treated patients (olanzapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) were:

Table 9: Common Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions Associated with the Use of Oral Olanzapine in 6-Week Trials — SCHIZOPHRENIA

a Personality disorder is the COSTART term for designating nonaggressive objectionable behavior.

Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine
(N=248)
Placebo
(N=118)
Postural hypotension 5 2
Constipation 9 3
Weight gain 6 1
Dizziness 11 4
Personality disordera 8 4
Akathisia 5 1
Table 10: Common Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions Associated with the Use of Oral Olanzapine in 3-Week and 4-Week Trials — Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)
Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine
(N=125)
Placebo
(N=129)
Asthenia 15 6
Dry mouth 22 7
Constipation 11 5
Dyspepsia 11 5
Increased appetite 6 3
Somnolence 35 13
Dizziness 18 6
Tremor 6 3

Olanzapine Intramuscular — There was 1 adverse reaction (somnolence) observed at an incidence of 5% or greater among intramuscular olanzapine for injection-treated patients and not observed at an equivalent incidence among placebo-treated patients (olanzapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) during the placebo-controlled premarketing studies. The incidence of somnolence during the 24 hour IM treatment period in clinical trials in agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I mania was 6% for intramuscular olanzapine for injection and 3% for placebo.

Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More among Oral Olanzapine-Treated Patients in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

Table 11 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with oral olanzapine (doses ≥2.5 mg/day) and with incidence greater than placebo who participated in the acute phase of placebo-controlled trials.

Table 11: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials with Oral Olanzapine
Body System/Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine
(N=532)
Placebo
(N=294)
Body as a Whole
Accidental injury 12 8
Asthenia 10 9
Fever 6 2
Back pain 5 2
Chest pain 3 1
Cardiovascular System
Postural hypotension 3 1
Tachycardia 3 1
Hypertension 2 1
Digestive System
Dry mouth 9 5
Constipation 9 4
Dyspepsia 7 5
Vomiting 4 3
Increased appetite 3 2
Hemic and Lymphatic System
Ecchymosis 5 3
Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders
Weight gain 5 3
Peripheral edema 3 1
Musculoskeletal System
Extremity pain (other than joint) 5 3
Joint pain 5 3
Nervous System
Somnolence 29 13
Insomnia 12 11
Dizziness 11 4
Abnormal gait 6 1
Tremor 4 3
Akathisia 3 2
Hypertonia 3 2
Articulation impairment 2 1
Respiratory System
Rhinitis 7 6
Cough increased 6 3
Pharyngitis 4 3
Special Senses
Amblyopia 3 2
Urogenital System
Urinary incontinence 2 1
Urinary tract infection 2 1

Dose Dependency of Adverse Reactions

A dose group difference has been observed for fatigue, dizziness, weight gain and prolactin elevation. In a single 8-week randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose study comparing 10 (N=199), 20 (N=200) and 40 (N=200) mg/day of oral olanzapine in adult patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, incidence of fatigue (10 mg/day: 1.5%; 20 mg/day: 2.1%; 40 mg/day: 6.6%) was observed with significant differences between 10 vs 40 and 20 vs 40 mg/day. The incidence of dizziness (10 mg/day: 2.6%; 20 mg/day: 1.6%; 40 mg/day: 6.6%) was observed with significant differences between 20 vs 40 mg. Dose group differences were also noted for weight gain and prolactin elevation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5, 5.15)].

The following table addresses dose relatedness for other adverse reactions using data from a schizophrenia trial involving fixed dosage ranges of oral olanzapine. It enumerates the percentage of patients with treatment-emergent adverse reactions for the 3 fixed-dose range groups and placebo. The data were analyzed using the Cochran-Armitage test, excluding the placebo group, and the table includes only those adverse reactions for which there was a trend.

Table 12: Percentage of Patients from a Schizophrenia Trial with Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions for the 3 Dose Range Groups and Placebo
Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine Olanzapine Olanzapine
Placebo 5 ± 2.5 mg/day 10 ± 2.5 mg/day 15 ± 2.5 mg/day
Adverse Reaction (N=68) (N=65) (N=64) (N=69)
Asthenia 15 8 9 20
Dry mouth 4 3 5 13
Nausea 9 0 2 9
Somnolence 16 20 30 39
Tremor 3 0 5 7

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term Trials of Oral Olanzapine as Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate

In the bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) adjunct placebo-controlled trials, the most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the combination of olanzapine and lithium or valproate (incidence of ≥5% and at least twice placebo) were:

Table 13: Common Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions Associated with the Use of Oral Olanzapine in 6-Week Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate Trials — Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)
Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine with lithium or valproate
(N=229)
Placebo with lithium or valproate
(N=115)
Dry mouth 32 9
Weight gain 26 7
Increased appetite 24 8
Dizziness 14 7
Back pain 8 4
Constipation 8 4
Speech disorder 7 1
Increased salivation 6 2
Amnesia 5 2
Paresthesia 5 2

Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More among Oral Olanzapine-Treated Patients in Short-Term Trials of Olanzapine as Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate

Table 14 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with the combination of olanzapine (doses ≥5 mg/day) and lithium or valproate and with incidence greater than lithium or valproate alone who participated in the acute phase of placebo-controlled combination trials.

Table 14: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Oral Olanzapine as Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate

a Denominator used was for females only (olanzapine, N=128; placebo, N=51).

Body System/Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine with lithium or valproate
(N=229)
Placebo with lithium or valproate
(N=115)
Body as a Whole
Asthenia 18 13
Back pain 8 4
Accidental injury 4 2
Chest pain 3 2
Cardiovascular System
Hypertension 2 1
Digestive System
Dry mouth 32 9
Increased appetite 24 8
Thirst 10 6
Constipation 8 4
Increased salivation 6 2
Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders
Weight gain 26 7
Peripheral edema 6 4
Edema 2 1
Nervous System
Somnolence 52 27
Tremor 23 13
Depression 18 17
Dizziness 14 7
Speech disorder 7 1
Amnesia 5 2
Paresthesia 5 2
Apathy 4 3
Confusion 4 1
Euphoria 3 2
Incoordination 2 0
Respiratory System
Pharyngitis 4 1
Dyspnea 3 1
Skin and Appendages
Sweating 3 1
Acne 2 0
Dry skin 2 0
Special Senses
Amblyopia 9 5
Abnormal vision 2 0
Urogenital System
Dysmenorrheaa 2 0
Vaginitisa 2 0

For specific information about the adverse reactions observed with lithium or valproate, refer to the Adverse Reactions section of the package inserts for these other products.

Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 1% or More among Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection-Treated Patients in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

Table 15 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of treatment-emergent adverse reactions that occurred in 1% or more of patients treated with intramuscular olanzapine for injection (dose range of 2.5-10 mg/injection) and with incidence greater than placebo who participated in the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I mania.

Table 15: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions: Incidence in Short-Term (24 Hour), Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials with Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection in Agitated Patients with Schizophrenia or Bipolar I Mania
Body System/Adverse Reaction Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Olanzapine
(N=415)
Placebo
(N=150)
Body as a Whole
Asthenia 2 1
Cardiovascular System
Hypotension 2 0
Postural hypotension 1 0
Nervous System
Somnolence 6 3
Dizziness 4 2
Tremor 1 0

Extrapyramidal Symptoms

The following table enumerates the percentage of patients with treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms as assessed by categorical analyses of formal rating scales during acute therapy in a controlled clinical trial comparing oral olanzapine at 3 fixed doses with placebo in the treatment of schizophrenia in a 6-week trial.

Table 16: Treatment-Emergent Extrapyramidal Symptoms Assessed by Rating Scales Incidence in a Fixed Dosage Range, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Oral Olanzapine in Schizophrenia — Acute Phase

a Percentage of patients with a Simpson-Angus Scale total score >3.

b Percentage of patients with a Barnes Akathisia Scale global score ≥2.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Placebo Olanzapine
5 ± 2.5 mg/day
Olanzapine
10 ± 2.5 mg/day
Olanzapine
15 ± 2.5 mg/day
Parkinsonisma 15 14 12 14
Akathisiab 23 16 19 27

The following table enumerates the percentage of patients with treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms as assessed by spontaneously reported adverse reactions during acute therapy in the same controlled clinical trial comparing olanzapine at 3 fixed doses with placebo in the treatment of schizophrenia in a 6-week trial.

Table 17: Treatment-Emergent Extrapyramidal Symptoms Assessed by Adverse Reactions Incidence in a Fixed Dosage Range, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Oral Olanzapine in Schizophrenia — Acute Phase

a Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: dystonia, generalized spasm, neck rigidity, oculogyric crisis, opisthotonos, torticollis.

b Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: akinesia, cogwheel rigidity, extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, hypokinesia, masked facies, tremor.

c Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: akathisia, hyperkinesia.

d Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: buccoglossal syndrome, choreoathetosis, dyskinesia, tardive dyskinesia.

e Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: movement disorder, myoclonus, twitching.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Placebo
(N=68)
Olanzapine
5 ± 2.5 mg/day
(N=65)
Olanzapine
10 ± 2.5 mg/day
(N=64)
Olanzapine
15 ± 2.5 mg/day
(N=69)
Dystonic eventsa 1 3 2 3
Parkinsonism eventsb 10 8 14 20
Akathisia eventsc 1 5 11 10
Dyskinetic eventsd 4 0 2 1
Residual eventse 1 2 5 1
Any extrapyramidal event 16 15 25 32

The following table enumerates the percentage of adolescent patients with treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms as assessed by spontaneously reported adverse reactions during acute therapy (dose range: 2.5 to 20 mg/day).

Table 18: Treatment-Emergent Extrapyramidal Symptoms Assessed by Adverse Reactions Incidence in Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Oral Olanzapine in Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder — Adolescents

a Categories are based on Standard MedDRA Queries (SMQ) for extrapyramidal symptoms as defined in MedDRA version 12.0.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Placebo Olanzapine
Categoriesa (N=89) (N=179)
Dystonic events 0 1
Parkinsonism events 2 1
Akathisia events 4 6
Dyskinetic events 0 1
Nonspecific events 0 4
Any extrapyramidal event 6 10

The following table enumerates the percentage of patients with treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms as assessed by categorical analyses of formal rating scales during controlled clinical trials comparing fixed doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection with placebo in agitation. Patients in each dose group could receive up to 3 injections during the trials [see Clinical Studies (14.3)]. Patient assessments were conducted during the 24 hours following the initial dose of intramuscular olanzapine for injection.

Table 19: Treatment-Emergent Extrapyramidal Symptoms Assessed by Rating Scales Incidence in a Fixed Dose, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection in Agitated Patients with Schizophrenia

a Percentage of patients with a Simpson-Angus Scale total score >3.

b Percentage of patients with a Barnes Akathisia Scale global score ≥2.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Placebo Olanzapine
IM
2.5 mg
Olanzapine
IM
5 mg
Olanzapine
IM
7.5 mg
Olanzapine
IM
10 mg
Parkinsonisma 0 0 0 0 3
Akathisiab 0 0 5 0 0

The following table enumerates the percentage of patients with treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms as assessed by spontaneously reported adverse reactions in the same controlled clinical trial comparing fixed doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection with placebo in agitated patients with schizophrenia.

Table 20: Treatment-Emergent Extrapyramidal Symptoms Assessed by Adverse Reactions Incidence in a Fixed Dose, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection in Agitated Patients with Schizophrenia

a Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: dystonia, generalized spasm, neck rigidity, oculogyric crisis, opisthotonos, torticollis.

b Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: akinesia, cogwheel rigidity, extrapyramidal syndrome, hypertonia, hypokinesia, masked facies, tremor.

c Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: akathisia, hyperkinesia.

d Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: buccoglossal syndrome, choreoathetosis, dyskinesia, tardive dyskinesia.

e Patients with the following COSTART terms were counted in this category: movement disorder, myoclonus, twitching.

Percentage of Patients Reporting Event
Placebo
(N=45)
Olanzapine
IM
2.5 mg
(N=48)
Olanzapine
IM
5 mg
(N=45)
Olanzapine
IM
7.5 mg
(N=46)
Olanzapine
IM
10 mg
(N=46)
Dystonic eventsa 0 0 0 0 0
Parkinsonism eventsb 0 4 2 0 0
Akathisia eventsc 0 2 0 0 0
Dyskinetic eventsd 0 0 0 0 0
Residual eventse 0 0 0 0 0
Any extrapyramidal events 0 4 2 0 0

Dystonia, Class Effect: Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, the frequency and severity are greater with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. In general, an elevated risk of acute dystonia may be observed in males and younger age groups receiving antipsychotics; however, events of dystonia have been reported infrequently (<1%) with olanzapine use.

Other Adverse Reactions

Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Clinical Trial Evaluation of Oral Olanzapine

Following is a list of treatment-emergent adverse reactions reported by patients treated with oral olanzapine (at multiple doses ≥1 mg/day) in clinical trials. This listing is not intended to include reactions (1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, (2) for which a drug cause was remote, (3) which were so general as to be uninformative, (4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or (5) which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo. Reactions are classified by body system using the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients.

  •   Body as a WholeInfrequent: chills, face edema, photosensitivity reaction, suicide attempt1; Rare: chills and fever, hangover effect, sudden death1.
  •   Cardiovascular SystemInfrequent: cerebrovascular accident, vasodilatation.
  •   Digestive SystemInfrequent: abdominal distension, nausea and vomiting, tongue edema; Rare: ileus, intestinal obstruction, liver fatty deposit.
  •   Hemic and Lymphatic SystemInfrequent: thrombocytopenia.
  •   Metabolic and Nutritional DisordersFrequent: alkaline phosphatase increased; Infrequent: bilirubinemia, hypoproteinemia.
  •   Musculoskeletal SystemRare: osteoporosis.
  •   Nervous SystemInfrequent: ataxia, dysarthria, libido decreased, stupor; Rare: coma.
  •   Respiratory SystemInfrequent: epistaxis; Rare: lung edema.
  •   Skin and AppendagesInfrequent: alopecia.
  •   Special SensesInfrequent: abnormality of accommodation, dry eyes; Rare: mydriasis.
  •   Urogenital SystemInfrequent: amenorrhea2, breast pain, decreased menstruation, impotence2, increased menstruation2, menorrhagia2, metrorrhagia2, polyuria2, urinary frequency, urinary retention, urinary urgency, urination impaired.

1 These terms represent serious adverse events but do not meet the definition for adverse drug reactions. They are included here because of their seriousness.

2 Adjusted for gender.

Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Clinical Trial Evaluation of Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection

Following is a list of treatment-emergent adverse reactions reported by patients treated with intramuscular olanzapine for injection (at 1 or more doses ≥2.5 mg/injection) in clinical trials. This listing is not intended to include reactions (1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, (2) for which a drug cause was remote, (3) which were so general as to be uninformative, (4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or (5) for which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo. Reactions are classified by body system using the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients.

  •   Body as a WholeFrequent: injection site pain.
  •   Cardiovascular SystemInfrequent: syncope.
  •   Digestive SystemInfrequent: nausea.
  •   Metabolic and Nutritional DisordersInfrequent: creatine phosphokinase increased.

Clinical Trials in Adolescent Patients (age 13 to 17 years)

Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Oral Olanzapine Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

Adverse reactions in adolescent patients treated with oral olanzapine (doses ≥2.5 mg) reported with an incidence of 5% or more and reported at least twice as frequently as placebo-treated patients are listed in Table 21.

Table 21: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Reactions of ≥5% Incidence among Adolescents (13-17 Years Old) with Schizophrenia or Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)

a Patients with the following MedDRA terms were counted in this category: hypersomnia, lethargy, sedation, somnolence.

b Patients with the following MedDRA terms were counted in this category: abdominal pain, abdominal pain lower, abdominal pain upper.

Adverse Reactions