Adult Cardiac Sonographer Performing Echocardiography to Screen for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in the Newborn

Publication Date: March 1, 2021
Last Updated: March 14, 2022

Key Points

  • A common feature of C-CHD is hypoxemia leading to cyanosis. However, this can be difficult to detect in infants with pigmented skin.
  • Based on recommendations from the Secretary‚Äôs Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children, as well as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Cardiology Foundation, and the American Heart Association, there has been an increased push for routine screening of newborns by pulse oximetry screening in the last decade.
  • A failed POS mandates immediate evaluation for C-CHD, including echocardiography.
  • The purpose of this document is to provide the adult sonographer, who does not typically screen for C-CHD, with the essential information and tools needed to detect C-CHD in newborns and aid in life-saving diagnosis.

Recommendations

  • Centers performing screening echocardiograms in newborns should have a formal relationship with a physician or referral center with expertise in C-CHD.
  • These centers should also have available high-frequency transducers, ECG leads, a mechanism for storage and transmission of images, and a structured two-way communication plan.
  • The interpreting pediatric cardiologist should work with the referring center to develop a method to relay a final report.

Overview

Title

Adult Cardiac Sonographer Performing Echocardiography to Screen for Critical Congenital Heart Disease in the Newborn

Authoring Organization